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‘There are two kinds of sufferers in this world: those who suffer from a lack of life and those who suffer from an overabundance of life. I’ve always found myself in the second category. When you come to think of it, almost all human behavior and activity is not essentially any different from animal behavior. The most advanced technologies and craftsmanship bring us, at best, up to the super-chimpanzee level. Actually, the gap between, say, Plato or Nietzsche and the average human is greater than the gap between that chimpanzee and the average human. The realm of the real spirit, the true artist, the saint, the philosopher, is rarely achieved.

Why so few? Why is world history and evolution not stories of progress but rather this endless and futile addition of zeroes. No greater values have developed. Hell, the Greeks 3,000 years ago were just as advanced as we are. So what are these barriers that keep people from reaching anywhere near their real potential? The answer to that can be found in another question, and that’s this: Which is the most universal human characteristic - fear or laziness?’

Louis H. Mackey (via dontshootthemessengerr)
connickillustrations:

Character study sketch. #sketch #art #illustration #Winston #1984 #character #biro #ink

connickillustrations:

Character study sketch. #sketch #art #illustration #Winston #1984 #character #biro #ink

theoreticallyyours:

Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Pushkin.

theoreticallyyours:

Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, and Pushkin.

My question - that which at the age of fifty brought me to the verge of suicide - was the simplest of questions, lying in the soul of every man from the foolish child to the wisest elder: it was a question without answering which one cannot live, as I had found by experience. It was: “What will come of what I am doing today or shall do tomorrow? - What will come of my whole life?” Differently expressed, the question is: “Why should I live, why wish for anything, or do anything?” It can also be expressed thus: “Is there any meaning in my life that the inevitable death awaiting me does not destroy?”
Leo Tolstoy in A Confession (1882)
banksys:

Banksy

banksys:

Banksy

To be surprised at nothing, they say, is a sign of great intelligence; in my opinion, it might serve equally as a sign of great stupidity.
Fyodor Dostoevsky, The Idiot (via vvmatsyuk)
Oh, yes, we shall be in chains and there will be no freedom, but then, in our great sorrow, we shall rise again to joy, without which man cannot live nor God exist, for God gives joy: it’s His privilege — a grand one. Ah, man should be dissolved in prayer! What should I be underground there without God? Rakitin’s laughing! If they drive God from the earth, we shall shelter Him underground. One cannot exist in prison without God; it’s even more impossible than out of prison. And then we men underground will sing from the bowels of the earth a glorious hymn to God, with Whom is joy. Hail to God and His joy! I love Him!
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky (via hreinleiki)
why does even the best person hold back something from another? why not say directly what we feel if we know that what we entrust won’t be scattered to the winds? as it is, everyone looks much tougher than he really is, as if he felt it’d be an insult to his feeling if he expressed them too readily.
dostoyevsky, white nights. (via swarbles)